Blur Average ratng: 5,0/5 1608reviews

View all cinema listings and buy tickets now at www.blur.co.uk New World Towers is the new documentary film on Blur, spanning the last few years of the band’s life. Directed by Sam Wrench, it records the genesis of the latest album “The Magic Whip”, from impromptu sessions on an unexpected stay in Hong Kong, to playing rousing live performances at Hyde Park and Hong Kong. New album ‘The Magic Whip’ out now. Album available on CD, vinyl and as a digital download. ITunes Amazon Official Store Google Play Spotify Subscribe to Blur's channel to be the first to hear about new videos: Follow Blur online. Warcraft Frozen Throne more.

• ' Released: 20 January 1997 • ' Released: 7 April 1997 • ' Released: 16 June 1997 • ' Released: 15 September 1997 Blur is the fifth studio album by the English band of the, released on 10 February 1997. Blur had previously been broadly critical of American popular culture and their previous albums had become associated with the movement, particularly (1994), which had helped them become one of Britain's leading pop acts. After their previous album,, the band faced media backlash and relationships between the members became strained. Under the suggestion of the band's guitarist,, the band underwent a stylistic change, becoming influenced by American bands such as. Recording took place in London as well as in, Iceland.

The Blur is our ride fast, ride far, ride-harder-than-your-heart-can-take XC race bike. Light enough to scorch hot laps and tough enough to endure a long-distance beating, the Blur does it all without compromise.

Drummer described the music on the album as being more aggressive and emotional than their previous work. Producer claimed that lead singer-songwriter had started writing about more personal experiences while Coxon revealed that listening to his lyrics it was clear to him that 'he'd obviously gone off his head a bit more'. Despite worries from Blur's label,, and the music press that the change in style would alienate the band's predominantly teenage fanbase and that the album would flop as a result, Blur, as well as lead single, ', reached the top of the UK charts and the album was certified platinum. The album also reached the top 20 in six other countries. The success of ' led to Blur becoming the band's most successful album in the US where the Britpop scene had been largely unsuccessful. The album received positive reviews from most music critics, many praising the stylistic change as well as Albarn's improved songwriting. Described himself as going through a 'mid pop life crisis' and longed for the band to write music 'that scared people again.'

Despite Blur's previous album, being released to positive reviews, and entering the UK charts at number one, the album's success was left in the shadows compared to by rivals which went quadruple platinum in the US. Blur became perceived as an 'inauthentic middle class pop band' in comparison to the 'working class heroes' Oasis, which made lead singer-songwriter, feel 'stupid and confused'. Bassist later summarised, 'After being the People's Hero, Damon was the People's Prick for a short period. Basically, he was a loser—very publicly.'

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Jessie Nizewitz Blur Fail